SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

Windmill Trust 20th Years Scholarship

Murray Art Museum Albury (MAMA)
4 September – 22 October 2017

Windmill Trust 20th Years Scholarship Exhibition install view, 2017

Windmill Trust 20th Years Scholarship Exhibition install view, 2017

To celebrate almost 20 years, the Windmill Trustees and Management Committee together with NAVA saw the opportunity to hold a 20th anniversary exhibition to celebrate the Windmill and to reconnect with past winners. The Windmill Trust with support from MAMA, the Murray Art Museum Albury hosted the exhibition and secured funding from Arts NSW ensured the fruition and success of this exhibition.


Northern Rivers Contemporary

Sydney Art Fair
Paper Contemporary
Curator Akky van Ogtrop
Booth P04 ‘Paper Contemporary
7 – 10 September 2017

Rochelle Summerfield, Travis Paterson, Leonie Lane

Rochelle Summerfield, Travis Paterson, Leonie Lane

‘Northern Rivers Contemporary’ are artists that play in a zone where classic and new media collide, to make contemporary works on paper that are playful and astute observations on nature, gender, history and identity.

Participating Artists: Christine Willcocks, Leonie Lane, Rochelle Summerfield, Travis Paterson, Scott Trevelyan. A selection of contemporary works on paper presented during Paper Contemporary.


Rochelle Summerfield – A Wayfarer on the Nepean.

At Penrith Regional Gallery & the Lewers Bequest
4 March – 21 May 2017

‘Rochelle Summerfield – A Wayfarer on the Nepean’ features drawing and animation works resulting from the artist’s recent Summer Studio Residency at Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest. While in residence at Penrith she considered the Nepean as a riverscape – a cultured and gendered space – all with a darkly humourous nod and a wink.Rochelle’s plucky red-shoed heroine – a recurring protagonist – makes an appearance again within the rich, lush riverscape of the Nepean.

The artist finds inspiration in riverscapes, and was strongly drawn to the Nepean – so much so she camped at the nearby riverside caravan park during her three-week professional artist’s residency last December. Each day Rochelle walked or bicycled from the caravan park to The Gallery along the banks of the Nepean River. She records her experience of the Nepean River as one of contradiction and love.

“I explored the river banks, felt summer’s heat and relished the shade of the trees. I observed the houses encroaching on the vegetation needed to stabilize the banks. I felt sadness at litter arrogantly left behind. I witnessed the community’s affection for the river partaking in picnics, weddings, swimming, boating and exercising. I thought about how the Nepean River is part of this city and its identity, and yet also estranged and neglected like so many of our rivers.”


‘Local Provenance’

The Boyd Gallery
Tweed Regional Gallery
15 July –4 December 2016

Rochelle Summerfield, Charming to Slumber, 2016, Pigment print on Hahnemuhle paper

‘Local Provenance’, curated by Jan Davis and Susi Muddiman OAM is the Tweed Regional Gallery’s contribution to the ‘Year of Print’ – a national celebration of the Print Council of Australia’s first 50 years of advocacy for Australian printmakers.

Local Provenance is a botanical term which describes plants grown from locally collected seed. This exhibition presents the work of twelve printmakers who live and work in the Lismore, Tweed, Byron, Kyogle or Grafton regions, or who trained locally in the printmaking studios at Southern Cross University. If we think of the university studios as a hothouse, then other gardening notions proliferate; seeding, germination, pollination, seed dispersal and regeneration. The development of these artists’ careers, from their local seeding to their current status as artists of national significance, can be described in these terms. Importantly, local institutions such as the Lismore, Grafton and Tweed Regional Galleries might be thought of as elaborate trellises that have supported the growth of these artists, and their collections are also acknowledged in this exhibition.


‘Future Public’

Public Art
Artlands Regional Arts Conference
Victoria Park, Dubbo
October 27 – 30, 2016

Rochelle Summerfield, Indicators Show Depth, 2016, 3 panel print on billboard, Victoria Park, Dubbo.

Rochelle Summerfield’s billboard, one of ten temporary public artworks installed in positions central to various venues for the Biennial Artlands Regional Arts Conference, Dubbo 2016

The curator Alex Wisser wrote, “The exhibition title ‘Future Public’ has been chosen because it communicates the exhibition’s intention to stretch boundaries and thinking about what is and can be public art.  The works are ‘propositional’ in nature, and while they will not need to be permanent artworks, they will need to exist in an outdoors environment for four days at least.”


Public Art Project- 2016 Graffiti Wall Mural

Grafton Regional Gallery Carpark
September 2016

2016 Graffiti Wall Mural Grafton Regional Gallery Carpark

The project was initiated by Rochelle Summerfield to facilitate youth 12-16 years to make a super character from collage. They had to think about ideas to show positive and/ or transformational strengths in the characters. The resulting characters would then be set in context of the Clarence River.

As the facilitator, we worked on two collage workshops, preparing and making the collage figures, then exploring them as drawings and paintings. Once scaled up, each young person worked on their character, and as a group we jointly painted the river in springtime, with the purple blooms of the Jacaranda trees. The mural is 2100mmh x 9700mmlong and was in the gallery carpark for 6 months.


‘Indicators Show Depth’

solo show
Grafton Regional Gallery
Main West Gallery
11 May – 2 July 2016

Rochelle Summerfield, Indicators Show Depth Installation, 2016, charcoal wall drawings, prints

Through collages of found, photographed and hand-drawn imagery, Rochelle Summerfield tells stories of female subjectivity, nature and transformation. Much can be inferred from our relationship with nature, and Summerfield creates images that explore how our identity is bound as much to the natural world as it is to relationships, responsibilities and the constraints of urban life. Summerfield’s collages are replete with references to the grotesque, burlesque and the art historical canon. Along with a dose of humour and irony, she uses these references to examine the body in flux as it seeks to find a place for itself within the Australian landscape.

Summerfield lives on the Clarence River in north-eastern New South Wales. It is one of the most beautiful and striking regions of Australia, this exhibition explores her relationship with the Clarence River since moving there 5 years ago.

Writer Rebecca Gallo


‘This is She’

Curator Rochelle Summerfield
31 March – 30 April
2016 Plunge Clarence Valley Arts and Culture Festival

This is she, Pop-Up Yamba, 2016 Plunge, photo by Cass Samms

Arts Northern Rivers partnered with Plunge 2016 for the Pop Up Hub in Yamba that will house an exhibition, workshop and residency space for the duration of the festival. http://artsnorthernrivers.com.au/project/pop-up-hub/

Local artist Rochelle Summerfield was commissioned by Arts Northern Rivers to curate part of the Pop Up and is taking the opportunity to showcase female artists from the Clarence Valley.

Curator Rochelle Summerfield “This is She celebrates women artists of the Clarence Valley at the Pop Up Hub, Yamba, Plunge. I chose works that reflected women’s experience of this landscape, its history and lifestyle. I found multifaceted approaches by creative women speaking of their experiences. This Clarence Valley story begins with Frances Belle Parker through beautifully stitched fine linen- tells of her indigenous family history that is bound to the Yaegl landscape and the river that runs through it- a story of love, identity and dispossession.  Artist Tracy Pateman, tells a classical Greek tale of the underworld set in the rolling hills of the Clarence Valley engraved in metals of copper and silver. The story of fire, memory and loss is told in delicate charcoal drawings by Sue Harris. This story also celebrates the dedication of being a woman artist at 83 years old- in quiet reflection and study of still life- by Pat Jenkins.” It is a contemporary story of our rich cultural legacy expressed through a diversity of media by women as only the arts can tell. Grateful thanks to Arts Northern Rivers NSW.


‘Aberrant Play’

Grafton Regional Gallery
Main Gallery
19 August – 11 October 2015

Grafton Regional Gallery, Aberrant Play, 2015, L-R: Art by Sandra Winkworth, Janet Parker Smith, Rochelle Summerfield.

‘Aberrant Play’ is an exhibition that celebrates contemporary approaches to printmaking and collage. Curated by local artist Rochelle Summerfield, the show includes seven artists from regional and metropolitan New South Wales. These artists push and break the rules of traditional printmaking, using their extensive knowledge of printmaking processes to combine old and new technologies, creating unusual, playful and striking results.

Artists- Claude Jones (Sydney and Munich), Jenny Kitchener (Kyogle), Leonie Lane (Clunes), Bill Moseley (Hill End), Janet Parker-Smith (Sydney), Rochelle Summerfield (Seelands) and Sandra Winkworth (Sydney).


‘Subject to Flooding’

formerly Brenda May Gallery, Sydney
7th Oct- 1st Nov 2014

Rochelle Summerfield, Brenda May Gallery, ‘Subject to Flooding’, 2014,
L-R: ‘Caressing’ ‘Ruminating’
Chromogenic Prints, 61cm x 73cm

An allegiance to collage, invention & the Clarence.
I recently moved to the Clarence Valley for love and found the mighty Clarence River. It’s been quite an adventure of discovery with my new relationship and a rural life that includes historical floods, fire and wildlife.Subject to flooding takes inspiration from this environment.

A small tributary off the mighty Clarence River meanders inland to an unknown and secret place, where lit by dappled sunlight perches a painted kingfisher and a collaged female form pondering the meaning of life, art and nature. She is what the body can be. She is my heroine. She is a beast, often flamboyant and may have wings when she wants to soar.


‘InConversation’

Spectrum Project Space
Edith Cowan University, Mt Lawley, Western Australia
9 October – 24 October 2014

‘Skirmish’ (video artist) Rebecca Ingram, (dancer) Samantha Crameri-Miller (visual artist) Rochelle Summerfield, sound by Mick Dick

‘Skirmish’ is a collaborative cross discipline conversation with video artist Rebecca Ingram, dancer Samantha Crameri-Miller and projected drawings/ animation by Rochelle Summerfield and sound by Mick Dick.  

The project was part of a curated cross-disciplinary/cross-art form collaborative exhibition in October 2014 at Spectrum Project Space, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA.  My drawing animated series contribution came from ‘The Elements Within Series’ an ironical look at the domestic chaos of our busy lives.


Freemantle Artist Residency

September 2013

Testing projections of my drawings with WAAPA 2nd year dancer Samantha Crameri-Miller.

A residency to explore and extend my collage practice and drawing at the Freemantle Arts Centre. The work was informed by historical research on women’s lives researching the historic Freemantle Arts Centre previous role as a women’s home.


‘She’s Hunting House’

Branch3d
Forest Lodge, Sydney.
21 April – 18 May 2013

Rochelle Summerfield ‘She’s Hunting House’ 2013, installation Branch 3D

New work ‘Love Like Salt’ 2013, an animation by Rochelle Summerfield (2012-13), sound by Mick Dick exhibited April- May 2013 at Branch3d Forest Lodge, Sydney.

I felt the looking glass shudder and peered through.  She is dancing upon the rooftops, stamping her time.  It is a dance of curiosity and wonder.  Her treasures are kept close.  She floats on a songbird.  Beware the entrapments.   I’m learning how to hunt house. 
 
I’m interested in ideas on the grotesque and fable, and how they elicit qualities of otherness, transformation, discovery and humour.  I work with collage as the classical cut and paste as well as the contemporary cut and paste of the digital space and the hybridization of photographic and print media.  The outside fragment brings the potential for imagination and invention to the pictorial field.


‘Going Gaga for Dada’

Brenda May Gallery
21 August – Saturday, 8 September, 2012

Rochelle Summerfield ‘Deviation’ 2010, Chromogenic Print, 50 x 60cm

By Zoe Bechara, Concrete Playground
It is not easy to reference, much less celebrate, the work of Dada artists. By its very nature the Dadaist art movement self-destructs at the mere hint of mainstream acceptance.  And yet here is Going Gaga for Dada – a dedication to the Dadaist chaos, nonsense and whimsy – so compelling and so deliciously relevant, it reminds the viewer that there is still plenty to be protesting about.

Dada, the artistic and literary manifesto of nonsense, originated in Europe during World War I as a protest against the atrocities the war was bringing to the artists’ front doors.  Out of disgust for a seemingly senseless war, the likes of Duchamp and Tzara created works intended to be provocatively absurd, as a metaphorical thumbing of the nose, if you like.

Here, curator and Dada scholar Akky van Ogtrop seeks to, like the Dadaists, define the undefinable, with contemporary mixed media such as collages, books, zines, posters and sculpture.  And while the Dadaist references in colour, composition and typography are frank and fierce, this exhibition still feels fresh, germane and utterly evocative.

Here, the iconic, horrifying irony of Dada is manifested (Richard Tipping, the ‘Gift’ and is joined by an ironing board (Dianne Beevers, ‘Bristling’) as absurdly inoperable at the iron itself.  Dianne Longley’s ceramics are wicked: the placement of Tim Burton-like baddies on the domesticity of plates is nightmarishly good.  A giggle at the ‘Chicken Tank’ (Will Coles) will lead your mind to questions of power in politics, and the anxiety of Rochelle Summerfield’s tumultuous cityscapes will evoke the words of Dadaist Hugo who lamented that “words emerge, shoulders of words, legs, arms – Dada is the heart of words.”


‘Aha’ Mutable Face

Master of Arts, by Research
Southern Cross University, Lismore, 2006

A body of work that proposed the image of the face as an assemblage of disparate objects and materials. In the lively fusion between various elements potential transformations occur. My primary methodology was collage to tease out the juxtapositions between ideas and processes to bring about transformative processes and manifest new ways of thinking and making work. Mixed media installation, multiplate etchings, collagraphs, collage, photography and fake fur faces.